Coverart for item
2.4 / 5
The Resource Why we build : power and desire in architecture, Rowan Moore, (overdrive ebook)

Why we build : power and desire in architecture, Rowan Moore, (overdrive ebook)

Label
Why we build : power and desire in architecture
Title
Why we build
Title remainder
power and desire in architecture
Statement of responsibility
Rowan Moore
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Title
Why we build
Creator
Subject
Genre
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Architecture is about activated emotion and desire, argues Observer architecture critic Moore in this wide-ranging, informative, and impassioned narrative of why architecture is fascinating, unstable, and a necessary poetry of the everyday. The book’s aim, he argues, is not to “instruct” but to reveal the actual intent behind building so as to correct what Moore defines as the central failure of development and architecture: disguising emotional choices as practical ones. Structuring his narrative thematically, Moore begins his lively account with the subject of desire, taking contemporary architectural forms in Dubai as his central example, a city whose mythology, he suggests, was created before the city itself came into existence, where buildings’ functionalities are subservient to illusion and speculation. Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi’s Glass House also exemplifies the dreamlike and poetic qualities that Dubai developers insist their buildings embody. Moore’s other themes are equally grand: architecture as persuasion, propaganda, and power; building as a sometimes deceptive and hopeful vision of the future; the relationship between building, financial value, and social values; architecture, death, and the eternal. Moore’s deftly chosen and analyzed examples range from Alberti’s Tempio Malatestiano and Jamaa el Fna “square” in Marrakesh to Manhattan’s High Line. This is a highly engaging if at times overbroad vision of architecture’s emotive and pragmatic powers. B&w photos throughout. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 1, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 26, p)
  • Most recently the architecture critic for the Observer (London), Moore (Building Tate Modern: Herzog & De Meuron ) leads the reader on an eclectic and far-ranging tour of the history of architecture. Along the way, he demonstrates a keen understanding of architecture and history by interweaving contemplations of design, form, and function—from ancient Rome to cathedrals of the European Middle Ages to the Louvre, and Soviet-era buildings. Moore even compares the functionality of two unique Massachusetts Institution of Technology buildings built 40 years apart and with significantly different impacts upon the users of these structures. A trained architect, the author explores the relationship between the act of building and the human condition over many centuries, infusing architectural design and construction with the wide variety of emotions resident in those who have designed lasting edifices. Through Moore's eyes, one sees that buildings survive beyond the days of their designers, builders, and residents and that architecture is not simply a synthesis of reason and function but an expression of human desire. VERDICT An excellent in-depth study of the connection between human feeling and desire in the design of magnificent buildings that affect entire societies and civilizations, this title will appeal most to academic readers and to serious students of architectural history.— John Creech, Central Washington Univ. Lib., Ellensburg --John Creech (Reviewed November 1, 2013) (Library Journal, vol 138, issue 20, p85)
  • A voracious exploration of emotion as part of the creation and evolution of architecture. There are times in reading this book when Observer architecture critic Moore seems breathless, so unstoppable is his hunger to get at the soul of the building process. Architecture is desire, he writes; it "is not a thing of pure reason or function, but is shaped by human emotions...and shapes them." Buildings, said the Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi, "act not alone, but reciprocally with the people and things around them, that they have to be open to chance, time, and life." Moore gracefully draws out when architecture enables other events and experiences to happen, and he explains how a city can contain multiple versions of itself. The "collective marvel" of a city is not, ultimately, the work of great architects, but the creation of "property developers in pursuit of their self-interest, real or perceived." The author also shows readers the flamboyance and sheer brilliance of Zaha Hadid and a worshipful company of celebrity architects--heart-stopping in their vision one second, then indulging in the post-9/11 "carnival of bitch-slapping and back-stabbing, of name-calling, pretention, manipulation, and posturing." Still, Moore supplies many exhilarating examples of architecture, from the wild exuberancy of Dubai to Prague's Muller House by Adolf Loos, from the Moscow Metro to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House, and how they--and many more--all have shaped lives in profound ways as both symbol and instrument. The dozens of included photos are also helpful. Form, light, scale, context, time--architecture, Moore ably shows, has the power to represent deep, abiding hope.(Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10217321
Cataloging source
TEFOD
Dewey number
720.1
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
power and desire in architecture
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleRemainder
power and desire in architecture
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleStatement
Rowan Moore
Label
Why We Build
Link
http://ohdbks.lib.overdrive.com/ContentDetails.htm?ID=AFA94882-CEF9-4484-A38B-AD0269572D32
Publication
Distribution
Copyright
Overdrive ID
afa94882-cef9-4484-a38b-ad0269572d32
Thumbnail
https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-200/0293-1/{AFA94882-CEF9-4484-A38B-AD0269572D32}Img200.jpg
Coverart
https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-100/0293-1/{AFA94882-CEF9-4484-A38B-AD0269572D32}Img100.jpg
Short Desc
<p>In an era of brash, expensive, provocative new buildings, a prominent critic argues that emotions--hope, power, sex, our changing relationship to the idea of home--are the most powerful force behind architecture, yesterday and (especially) today.</p><p>We are living in one of the most dramatic periods in modern architectural history: a time when cityscapes are being redrawn on a yearly basis, architects are testing the very idea of what a building is, and whole cities are being invented overnight, both here in the United States and in exotic locations around the world.</p><p>In this bold and wide-ranging new work, Rowan Moore--former director of the Architecture Foundation, now a leading architecture critic--explores the reasons behind these changes in our built environment, and how they in turn are changing the way we live in the world. Taking as his starting point dramatic examples such as the High Line in New York City and the outrageous island experiment of Dubai, Moore...
Description
<p>In an era of brash, expensive, provocative new buildings, a prominent critic argues that emotions&#8212;such as hope, power, sex, and our changing relationship to the idea of home&#8212;are the most powerful force behind architecture, yesterday and (especially) today.</p><p>We are living in the most dramatic period in architectural history in more than half a century: a time when cityscapes are being redrawn on a yearly basis, architects are testing the very idea of what a building is, and whole cities are being invented overnight in exotic locales or here in the United States.</p><p>Now, in a bold and wide-ranging new work, Rowan Moore&#8212;former director of the Architecture Foundation, now the architecture critic for The Observer&#8212;explores the reasons behind these changes in our built environment, and how they in turn are changing the way we live in the world. Taking as his starting point dramatic examples such as the High Line in New York City and the outrageous island experiment of Dubai, Moore then reaches far and wide: back in time to explore the Covent Garden brothels of eighteenth-century London and the fetishistic minimalism of Adolf Loos; across the world to assess a software magnate's grandiose mansion in Atlanta and Daniel Libeskind's failed design for the World Trade Center site; and finally to the deeply naturalistic work of Lina Bo Bardi, whom he celebrates as the most underrated architect of the modern era.</p>
Sample
https://samples.overdrive.com/why-we-build-afa948?.epub-sample.overdrive.com
Popularity
61
Rating
2.4
Media Type
eBook
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
ocm856523132
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/crossRefId
1223489
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/ikey
9780062277596
Isbn
9780062277596
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePartial
True
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)856523132

Library Locations

  • Delaware Main LibraryBorrow it
    84 East Winter Street, Delaware, OH, 43015
    40.299672 -83.064923
  • Orange BranchBorrow it
    7171 Gooding Blvd., Delaware, OH, 43015
    40.190037 -83.027387
  • Ostrander BranchBorrow it
    75 North Fourth Street, Ostrander, OH, 43061
    40.267330 -83.216989
  • Powell BranchBorrow it
    460 South Liberty Street, Powell, OH, 43065
    40.149379 -83.073659
Processing Feedback ...