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The Resource Lulu and the duck in the park, by Hilary McKay ; illustrated by Priscilla Lamont

Lulu and the duck in the park, by Hilary McKay ; illustrated by Priscilla Lamont

Label
Lulu and the duck in the park
Title
Lulu and the duck in the park
Statement of responsibility
by Hilary McKay ; illustrated by Priscilla Lamont
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Lulu, who loves animals, brings an abandoned duck egg to school, even though her teacher has banned Lulu from bringing animals to school ever again
Member of
Tone
Character
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2013
  • Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth, 2012
  • USBBY Outstanding International Book, 2013.
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Grades 2-4 Lulu, who loves every sort of animal, tries to convince her teacher that their class guinea pig needs a companion. Unfortunately, her methods lead Mrs. Holiday to announce that if anyone brings another animal to school, she’ll trade their class pet for a stick insect. When their weekly visit to a nearby park ends in disaster (large dogs running wild and destroying ducks’ nests and eggs), Lulu catches the one remaining egg as it rolls downhill, and she pockets it. All through the school day, she protects the egg and keeps it warm, revealing her secret only to her best friend (and cousin), Mellie. When the egg begins to hatch, though, Lulu finds a powerful, if unexpected, ally. Best known for the Exiles trilogy and her novels about the Casson family, McKay shows a rare ability to capture a younger audience in this involving chapter book for transitional readers. The well-structured, third-person narrative builds dramatic tension; provides comic relief of the most believable sort; and shows plenty of heart. Depicting Lulu and Mellie as biracial children in a multicultural classroom, Lamont’s appealing black-and-gray drawings reveal the characters with verve and finesse. The first in a new series, this memorable story is just right for children moving to chapter books. -- Phelan, Carolyn (Reviewed 10-01-2012) (Booklist, vol 109, number 3, p53)
  • /* Starred Review */ Gr 1 – 3 — In this entertaining chapter book, readers are introduced to irrepressible Lulu, "famous for her love of animals." She loves her old dog, Sam, as much as the spiders in her house. She loves the snails in her garden as much as her hamster and guinea pig. Lulu's mother is famous for saying, "The more the merrier. As long as Lulu cleans up after them." However, her teacher is almost as famous for not liking animals. When Lulu's dog follows her to school, Mrs. Holiday declares that if any child brings an animal into the room as a visitor, the class guinea pig will have to go live elsewhere. Then, on a trip to the park, after a wild rumpus in which two overly enthusiastic dogs trample all of a mother duck's spring nests, Lulu notices an intact egg. She gently places it in her pocket on the way back to the classroom. Her best friend and cousin, Mellie, is sworn to secrecy and becomes an accomplice as they try to hide and protect it. McKay's pacing is spot-on, and the story moves briskly. Lamont's black-and-white illustrations capture the sparkle in Lulu's eyes and the warmth and fuzziness of a newly hatched duckling. The satisfying ending will have children awaiting the next installment in what is likely to become a hit series for fans of other plucky characters like Horrible Harry, Stink, and Junie B. Jones.—Lisa Kropp, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY --Lisa Kropp (Reviewed November 1, 2012) (School Library Journal, vol 58, issue 11, p80)
  • /* Starred Review */ “Lulu was famous for animals,” opens this sparkling series launch, first published in the U.K., about Lulu, an irrepressible girl with a penchant for acquiring pets. And, McKay explains in her characteristically understated and cheerful narrative, “it was very lucky for Lulu that her mother was famous for saying, ‘The more, the merrier.’ ” Lulu’s adventures begin when her dog follows her to school (thanks to the trail of treats she drops en route), agitating the class guinea pig and further irritating her gruff teacher. The crux of the novel is Lulu’s rescue of a duck egg she finds after dogs storm the park during a class outing. She sneaks the egg into school and, in one of many droll and endearing scenes, quacks to the egg so “it doesn’t get lonely.” Though aimed at a younger audience than McKay’s Exiles novels and series about the Casson family, this offering has similarly abundant humor and heart. Lamont’s (Animal Rescue Team) robust cartoon spot art offers lively, loose portraits of the story’s human and animal characters alike. Ages 7–9. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 30, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 31, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ A warmhearted beginning to a new chapter-book series delights from the first few sentences. "Lulu was famous for animals. Her famousness for animals was known throughout the whole neighborhood." So it begins, revealing its bouncy language and its theme, illustrated by a cheery image of Lulu with bunnies at her feet, a parrot on her shoulder and a mouse in her hair. Lulu's best friend is her cousin Mellie, who is famous for several things but most notably losing sweaters, pencils and everything else. Her teacher in Class Three is Mrs. Holiday, who endures the class guinea pig but does not think it needs animal companions, not even Lulu's dog. When the class goes to Tuesday swimming at the pool by the park, however, and Lulu finds a duck egg, which she takes back to class--that is not an animal, right? Well, not yet. What Lulu and Mellie do to protect the egg, get through class and not outrage Mrs. Holiday is told so simply and rhythmically, and so true to the girls' perfectly-logical-for-third-graders' thinking, that it will beguile young readers completely. The inclusion of the kid who always gets a bloody nose and a math lesson on perimeter only adds to the verisimilitude and the fun. Lulu's classroom is full of children of all colors, and Lulu and Mellie are the color of strong tea with cream, judging from the cover. Utterly winning. (Fiction. 7-9)(Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2012)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10141865
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McKay, Hilary
Dewey number
[Fic]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
PZ7.M4786574
LC item number
Lu 2012
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 1
  • 3
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Lamont, Priscilla
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Lulu
Series volume
01
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Animals
  • Schools
Target audience
primary
Label
Lulu and the duck in the park, by Hilary McKay ; illustrated by Priscilla Lamont
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
104 p.
Isbn
9780807548080
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2012-8229
Note
Booktalk SRC 2013
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)782897564
Label
Lulu and the duck in the park, by Hilary McKay ; illustrated by Priscilla Lamont
Publication
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
104 p.
Isbn
9780807548080
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2012-8229
Note
Booktalk SRC 2013
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)782897564

Library Locations

  • Delaware Main LibraryBorrow it
    84 East Winter Street, Delaware, OH, 43015, US
    40.299672 -83.064923
  • Orange BranchBorrow it
    7171 Gooding Blvd., Delaware, OH, 43015, US
    40.190037 -83.027387
  • Ostrander BranchBorrow it
    75 North Fourth Street, Ostrander, OH, 43061, US
    40.267330 -83.216989
  • Powell BranchBorrow it
    460 South Liberty Street, Powell, OH, 43065, US
    40.149379 -83.073659
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