The Resource Double victory. | Double victory : how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II, Cheryl Mullenbach, (overdrive ebook)

Double victory. | Double victory : how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II, Cheryl Mullenbach, (overdrive ebook)

Label
Double victory : how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II
Title
Double victory
Title remainder
how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II
Statement of responsibility
Cheryl Mullenbach
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Allow all black nurses to enlist, and the draft won't be necessary. . . . If nurses are needed so desperately, why isn't the Army using colored nurses?<P style=MARGIN: 0in 0.5in 0pt 0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none class=MsoNormal> <P style=MARGIN: 0in 0.5in 0pt 0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none class=MsoNormal>My arm gets a little sore slinging a shovel or a pick, but then I forget about it when I think about all those boys over in the Solomons.<P style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none class=MsoNormal> <P style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt class=MsoNormal>Double Victory tells the stories of African American women who did extraordinary things to help their country during World War II. In these pages young readers meet a range of remarkable women: war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers. Some, such as Mary McLeod Bethune and Lena Horne, were celebrated in their lifetimes and are well known today. But many others fought discrimination at home and abroad in order to contribute to the war effort yet were overlooked during those years and forgotten by later generations. Double Victory recovers the stories of these courageous women, such as Hazel Dixon Payne, the only woman to serve on the remote Alaska-Canadian Highway; Deverne Calloway, a Red Cross worker who led a protest at an army base in India; and Betty Murphy Phillips, the only black female overseas war correspondent. Offering a new and diverse perspective on the war and including source notes and a bibliography, Double Victory is an invaluable addition to any student's or history buff's bookshelf
Title
Double victory
Creator
Summary
An account of the lesser-known contributions of African-American women during World War II reveals how they helped lay the foundations for the Civil Rights Movement by challenging racial and gender barriers at home and abroad
Subject
Member of
Genre
Review
  • Gr 7 Up &mdash; This scholarly volume gives a comprehensive view of the efforts of African American women who integrated the workforce in both civilian and military positions during World War II. Providing personal accounts of women who worked on highways, as war correspondents, and as entertainers and political activists, five chapters, illustrated with black-and-white photographs and reproductions, look at advances in each of these areas. Though the personal stories help, the text is dense and detailed. Thus, it is a bit dry, making it most useful for research or as a report resource. That aside, this is an excellent title for expanding students' view of the Civil Rights Movement, showing just how many people it took to achieve even the legislative ends realized under President Lyndon Johnson. Additionally, by focusing on women, it gives background on an aspect of the Women's Movement that is often overlooked and on the course of the broader Civil Rights Movement.&mdash;Ann Welton, Grant Elementary School, Tacoma, WA --Ann Welton (Reviewed January 1, 2013) (School Library Journal, vol 59, issue 1, p134)
  • The role of African-American women in World War II, both at home and abroad, has not been explored as fully as other aspects of that war, and Mullenbach here addresses this deficit. The women who tried to participate struggled against multiple obstacles: prejudice against women, segregated institutions and deep-seated discrimination against blacks in the United States. Despite these realities, many African-American women were determined to have a role in the war effort and to use their struggles to push the country toward greater inclusion for all. This exploration makes clear how hard they fought on their own behalf and how resistant U.S. society was to change, even in wartime and even as its leaders sought to galvanize the country around "four essential human freedoms." Mullenbach effectively weaves this narrative by presenting a wide variety of individual stories of struggle, some victorious, others discouraging, many accompanied by period photographs. Whether she is describing a boycott of segregated Independence Day celebrations at an overseas Red Cross club or the indignities of Jim Crow travel for uniformed women, their dogged determination to fully engage is revealed. One of the many strengths of the book is the range of areas affected, including journalism, manufacturing, troop support, military nursing and many others. Ultimately, their unstinting efforts during World War II helped pave the way for the civil rights movement and major societal change. A valuable asset. (notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction 14 & up)(Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2012)
Award
Amelia Bloom Lists, 2014
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10167700
Cataloging source
TEFOD
Dewey number
940.53082/0973
Index
index present
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/lexile
1130
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 7
  • 12
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Women of action
Target audience
juvenile
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleRemainder
how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleStatement
Cheryl Mullenbach
Label
Double victory. | Double victory : how African American women broke race and gender barriers to help win World War II, Cheryl Mullenbach, (overdrive ebook)
Authority link
Link
http://ohdbks.lib.overdrive.com/ContentDetails.htm?ID=B6E9EC57-5BB7-4FC2-BE7E-8EF6C3FBB48C
Publication
Creator
Note
Print version:
Overdrive ID
b6e9ec57-5bb7-4fc2-be7e-8ef6c3fbb48c
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
War workers: "Negroes cannot be accepted" -- Political activists: "I am not a party girl, I want to build a movement" -- In the military: "will all the colored girls move over on this side" -- Volunteers: "back the attack" -- Entertainers: "we don't take your kind"
Control code
ocm820869049
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
  • 1st ed.
  • 1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781569768082
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)820869049

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