The Resource Bigger than a bread box, Laurel Snyder

Bigger than a bread box, Laurel Snyder

Label
Bigger than a bread box
Title
Bigger than a bread box
Statement of responsibility
Laurel Snyder
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Devastated when her parents separate, twelve-year-old Rebecca must move with her mother from Baltimore to Gran's house in Atlanta, where Rebecca discovers an old breadbox with the power to grant any wish--so long as the wished-for thing fits in the breadbox
Title
Bigger than a bread box
Creator
Summary
Devastated when her parents separate, twelve-year-old Rebecca must move with her mother from Baltimore to Gran's house in Atlanta, where Rebecca discovers an old breadbox with the power to grant any wish--so long as the wished-for thing fits in the breadbox
Subject
Genre
Story line
Writing style
Review
  • Gr 4 – 6 — Rebecca's parents have been struggling to get along. Suddenly, Mom packs up 12-year-old Rebecca and toddler Lew to drive to Atlanta to stay with her mother. Rebecca is furious and misses her friends, school, and, most of all, her dad. In the attic, she discovers a bread box, at the same time missing the gulls in Baltimore and wishing there were some in Atlanta. She looks inside to find that two birds have appeared. She soon figures out that wishes that can fit in the box magically materialize, but those that can't, such as going home or getting her parents back together, are not granted. As often happens with wishes, things go awry; all of the items she has wished for-money, an iPod, a birthday gift for her mother-belonged to someone else and she is accused of stealing. Snyder weaves in her magic without letting it take over and become the focus. Rebecca's choices are not always understandable, but her heartache is. The slightly over-the-top resolution will be both scary and satisfying to readers. This is solid fiction for the elementary crowd. It doesn't rely on one-dimensional bad guys and doesn't let readers think that the good guys are flawless.—Carol A. Edwards, Denver Public Library, CO --Carol A. Edwards (Reviewed September 1, 2011) (School Library Journal, vol 57, issue 9, p173)
  • "Everything felt wrong, lopsided. I knew from the weird fuzzy humming inside my head," thinks 12-year-old Rebecca Shapiro as her family ruptures before her eyes. Rebecca's father has been out of work, and her mother is fed up; after a big fight with her husband, she packs up the children and drives from Baltimore to Atlanta to visit Rebecca and Lew's grandmother. When Rebecca discovers this isn't just a quick visit (her mother has a temp job for herself lined up and a new school picked out for Rebecca), she's furious. One day while exploring her grandmother's attic, Rebecca finds a magic breadbox that will grant any wish that fits inside it: a cookie, money, pens, lip-gloss, candy, or a diamond. But Rebecca comes to understand that the box won't solve her problems (conversely, it creates some enormous ones); she has to do that on her own. Introspective and rich with delicate imagery, this coming-of-age tale shares themes with Snyder's Penny Dreadful (2010). The insightful, memorable, and complex characters that Snyder creates result in a story with the same qualities. Ages 8–12. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 4, 2011) (Publishers Weekly, vol 258, issue 27, p)
  • Twelve-year-old Rebecca realistically deals with the fallout of her parents' separation, aided (surprisingly) by a magical bread box. Rebecca's mother, fed up with her husband's lackadaisical attitude, abruptly moves out, taking the teen and her toddler brother from their home in Baltimore to live with their grandmother in Atlanta. There, Rebecca discovers a magical bread box. Almost anything she wishes for immediately appears in it. Initially, this seems like the answer to all her problems: She can wish for attractive clothes to make herself more popular in her new school, or for money that might ease her parents' problems, or even for the perfect birthday present for her mother, although she continues to seethe at the woman's self-focus. But not surprisingly, the magic comes with a significant catch, as magic often does. The discoveries Rebecca makes about herself and her relationship with her parents are achingly authentic. While the bread box provides a nice infusion of fantasy, this tale is as much focused on Rebecca's maturing understanding of her family's problems as it is on magic. Her appealing first-person narration rings true, and the characters around her are also believably portrayed, creating a tight tale with broad appeal. Elements of magic add to this enjoyable coming-of-age tale of family problems and personal growth. (Fantasy. 10-14)(Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2011)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10014527
Cataloging source
DLC
Index
no index present
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/lexile
680
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 2
  • 8
Target audience
pre adolescent
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleStatement
by Laurel Snyder
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/titleVariation
Bigger than a breadbox
Label
Bigger than a bread box, Laurel Snyder
Publication
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
226 p.
Isbn
9780375969164
Lccn
2010047307

Library Locations

  • Delaware Main LibraryBorrow it
    84 East Winter Street, Delaware, OH, 43015
    40.299672 -83.064923
  • Orange BranchBorrow it
    7171 Gooding Blvd., Delaware, OH, 43015
    40.190037 -83.027387
  • Ostrander BranchBorrow it
    75 North Fourth Street, Ostrander, OH, 43061
    40.267330 -83.216989
  • Powell BranchBorrow it
    460 South Liberty Street, Powell, OH, 43065
    40.149379 -83.073659
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